Updated: Grammar Suppliers Page — Tools for Authors & Writers

GRAMMAR SUPPLIERS

STYLE GUIDES

GRAMMAR A+ REFRESHERS

GRAMMAR REFRESHERS:
GRAMMAR TIPS:

GRAMMAR BOOKS

GRAMMAR CHECKERS

GRAMMAR & SPELLING:
WRITING COMPREHENSIVE:

GRAMMAR HELP & CHEERLEADERS

WRITER ENCOURAGEMENT:
CREATIVE WRITING:
MINDMAPPING:

GRAMMAR WORD-FIND

DICTIONARIES & THESAURUSES:
SEARCHES & RESEARCH:

GENRE-SPECIFIC INTERESTS

ALL BOOKS:
BIOGRAPHY:
FICTION:
MAGAZINES (Online):
POETRY:
SONG:

PUBLISHING & MARKETING AIDS

EXPANDING YOUR AUDIENCE:
PROPOSALS & QUERIES:
PUBLISHERS:
WRITER TRAINING:

WRITING GROUPS & TEAMS

 

Advertisements

A Good Editor

“A good editor will not just point out errors; she explains them, providing you with an education to enable you to perform a stronger rewrite. For instance, if your manuscript includes point-of-view violations—a major reason for fiction rejection—she will offer a thorough explanation of the concept and provide easy-to-understand examples. A good editor will encourage you and compliment you on your strengths, but she will not hold back in showing you where you need improvement or are making repeated mistakes. She does not expect you to know all the book publishing rules for copyediting—that’s her job. But she does try to help you understand some basic underlying principles that you might need to learn in order to be a better writer. A good editor knows your book is your “baby” and that you have poured many hours into writing it, but her goal is to help you make that book the best it can be, and sometimes that requires you, the author, to make drastic changes. In other words, a good editor is “on your side” and wants to help, but she is mostly concerned with getting your book in the best shape possible.”

— C. S. Lakin / critiquemymanuscript.com

Need A Writing Prompt?

[found on dailywritingtips.com; by Simon Kewin]

“Where To Find Writing Prompts Online

The internet is a wonderful source of writing prompts. There are sites dedicated to providing them which a quick search will turn up. Examples include :

There are also numerous blogs that offer a regular writing prompt to inspire you and where you can, if you wish, post what you’ve written. Examples include :

There are also many other sites that can, inadvertently, provide a rich seam of material for writing prompts – for example news sites with their intriguing headlines or pictorial sites such as Flickr.com that give you access to a vast range of photographs that can prompt your writing.

If you’re on Twitter, there are users you can follow to receive a stream of prompts, for example :

Another idea is just to keep an eye on all the tweets being written by people all over the world, some of which can, inadvertently, be used as writing prompts.

How To Make Your Own Writing Prompts

You can find ideas for writing prompts of your own from all sorts of places : snatches of overheard conversation, headlines, signs, words picked from a book and so on. Get used to keeping an eye out for words and phrases that fire your imagination, jot them down and use them as writing prompts to spark your creativity. You never know where they might take you.”

For more great information on writing from DailyWritingTips, click HERE.

[found on http://www.dailywritingtips.com/writing-prompts-101]