Short Stories Aren’t Less

For a great article on the power of the short story, read Carmen DeSousa’s blog.

“Short stories are a great way to meet an author without a long commitment or a nice release when you need just a little escape before going to bed, since there’s no risk of staying up too late to finish the story, as most short stories take less than an hour to read.”

— Carmen DeSousa

Advertisements

Featured Writing Addict: Mary Ross Smith

Mary Ross Smith

Mary was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, the youngest of five children. Her family moved to Los Angeles, California in 1947. Both parents were entrepreneurs. Her mother was the founder of a prominent African-American mortuary in Los Angeles, and her father owned a service station. She grew up in Los Angeles and spent most of her young years in the funeral home where she learned the details and secrets of that business. Her young life was very troubled and sometimes threatened thus causing her to seek refuge among the dead. Mary’s two books use humor and drama to reveal mortuary life.

What’s Mary’s Genre?

Nonfiction & Fiction/Romance

What’s  Mary’s Inspiration?

“I wrote Soul Survivor to heal me, but soon found out that everyone has a story. My goal is to inspire others to know that life is about choices; they can make a change in their life, no matter how bad things are today. Something good can happen tomorrow. Never give up!

What are Mary Ross Smith’s books about?

Soul Survivor

Soul Survivor explores the depths of human emotions, both real and imagined. A true story of fortitude, an iron will, and looking to the future in the hope that tomorrow will be better than today.
 

Amazon.com Book Description:

“…explores the depths of human emotions, both real and imagined. That any of us reach adulthood in one piece, emotionally or physically is a miracle of no small proportion. That any of us reach adulthood to contribute back to society and become highly respected in the community is truly a gift of time and place.
 
…a true story of fortitude, an iron will and looking to the future in the hope that tomorrow will be better than today. …nothing less than a story of triumph. “Little Mary” Reese spent her childhood living, working and playing in a funeral home. Her mother, Mrs. Mary (“Big Mary”) Reese, was well known and respected in the African-American community in Los Angeles through the operation of a prestigious black funeral home. Little Mary’s story tells what really happens behind the embalming room doors—the light and dark side of life.
 
[This book] is both humorous and mischievous, and talks of sex, murder, voodoo, preachers and deviate gravediggers. Famous entertainers that passed through Little Mary’s life include Redd Foxx, Lou Rawls, Sam Cooke, Billy Preston and Johnny Cochran. Little Mary was born in 1944 in the South, reared in the Southwest and was often disparagingly referred to as “high-yellow.” During racial tensions of the ‘50s and ‘60s, Little Mary found her hue to be a major issue but not her only problem.
 
Mary’s mother caused her to endure life-threatening situations due to her drinking and wild ways. Little Mary’s childhood experiences, the mental and physical abuse faced each day, led her to believe that her only true friends were the dead people in the funeral home. Indeed, Little Mary received a BS degree (Be Smart) at an early age. It was the only way she knew to survive. Little Mary’s story is an unlikely but revealing peek into the unexpected and in the end, truly a story of a Soul Survivor.”
 
 
SOS
Challenge you to look at the person behind the pulpit!
 

 

 

 

 

To reach Mary Ross Smith, buy her books, or schedule a book-signing event:

Tell her you heard about her on editingaddict.com!

The New Reality of Author Platforms

[found on forbes.com; by Alan Rinzler]

“It’s still about visibility, but today’s approach has changed. The New Author Platform requires a focus on developing an unobstructed back and forth between authors and their readers, with the authors — not the publishers — controlling the flow.

Now it’s the author, not a publicist, who inspires readers to buy the book. The New Author Platform allows not only well-established authors, but unknown, first-time beginners to do an end run around the conservative gate-keepers and reach readers directly.”

To find out more from Alan Rinzler about author platforms, and how to create your own, click here.

[found on http://www.forbes.com/sites/booked/2011/07/26/the-new-author-platform-what-writers-need-to-know]

Characters Develop Your Romance

[found on writing-world.com; by Karen Wiesner]

“Let your characters decide the level of intimacy, not publisher guidelines.

I used to base everything I wrote on what the publishers might buy. I suppose it makes some sense to do that when you’re not published. Target your publisher, then tailor what you write to that set of guidelines. Sounds logical, right? I’m not so sure. A part of me really believes that the reason I didn’t sell all those years was because I was trying to write for everyone else except myself and what fit my characters. If you’re writing for someone else, you’re not writing what’s in your heart… and it’s going to show.

The same is true for love scenes. In every one of my books, the level of intimacy is a little different, depending on what that particular hero and heroine dictate. Restless as Rain and Forever Man are strongly what I dub “romantic erotica” because the emotions are as hot as the physical lovemaking. The characters in these books are very extreme, larger than life and they demand a sexuality that suits their personalities. In First Love, the sexual tension is definitely there from start to finish and the love scenes are satisfying without being overtly erotic.

However, the hero and heroine in this book are in need of emotional healing, more so than sexual healing. Their lovemaking is part of that healing process, and it suited them to have emotionally sensual loves scenes rather than down-and-dirty, deep ones. Leather & Lace, my first published book, was completely different. The heroine in the book was very innocent and naive. When she thought of lovemaking, it was always in a more “romantic” sense and, because she was so private, having more low-key love scenes were appropriate. The sexual tension remained throughout, however.”

For more tips on writing from Karen Wiesner, click here.

[found on http://www.writing-world.com/romance/love.shtml]

Featured Writing Addict: Emjay Luby

Emjay Luby

164938_104098889782206_213049138_n

Since the day Emjay haltingly read See Spot Run, she was hooked on the written word. As a child, she looked forward to bedtime, because bed and reading went together. All the Luby kids slept with their arms wrapped around books — not stuffed animals.

When she first read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn at the age of 15, she determined that she wanted to be a word spinner — an author — like Betty Smith. She signed up for the Famous Writers Course when she was an 18-year-old stay-at-home mom. Her first story was painstakingly pounded out on an ancient Underwood typewriter.

Many more courses followed over the years, until she finally learned that if she wanted to become a good writer, she needed to spend less time reading about writing, and more time putting words on paper.

She sent an article to a Sunday School quarterly, and was thrilled when they not only accepted her story but paid her $15 for doing what she loved. A Christian magazine accepted an article about her family’s missionary trip to Mexico a few years later.

Many years have passed since she first came up with the idea for The Courting Dress. The outline, character studies, and a couple of chapters sat in the back of a closet until she shared a few pages of the story at an Abba’s Writers meeting. “The women encouraged, prodded, and coerced me to continue writing, and get the book published. I’m grateful for their patience and perseverance as I limped my way to the finish line.”

What’s Emjay Luby’s Genre?

Fiction: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Romance

What’s  Emjay Luby’s Inspiration?

“I’m fascinated by old mining towns like Madrid in New Mexico and Jerome in Arizona. One day as I was walking through a mining museum, I thought, It would be so cool to go back in time and meet some of the people who lived and worked in these rough-and-tumble towns. Nathan Pierce, Mandy Steven’s love interest in The Courting Dress, is one of those men.”

What is Emjay Luby’s book about?

The Courting Dress

EMJAY.004“One night in March of 1994, while searching through her grandmother’s hope chest, Mandy Stevens finds a charming dress. She impulsively slips it over her head, and is instantly transported from her bedroom in Phoenix, to the middle of a dusty road, and there’s a car barreling down on her! Frozen in disbelief, she’s tackled and thrown out of the path of danger. Her rescuer, Nathan Pierce, tells the bewildered woman she’s in the mining town of Jerome, and the year is 1934.  Mandy, whose feet have always been firmly planted on the ground, soon finds herself torn between two eras — one holds the familiar people, places, and things of everyday life, but the other holds a chance to be with the only man she’s ever loved. The past or the present…which one will Mandy choose, or does she have a choice at all?”

 

 

To reach Emjay Luby, buy her books, or schedule a book-signing event: